Fabric Finishing

11 May.,2021

Consumers would not readily accept most cloths in the state in which they emerge from the wearing, kniting or other manufacturing processes. Unfinished fabrics, referred to as greige or grey goods, contain many impurities, have a harsh hand and little esthetic appeal.

 

Consumers would not readily accept most cloths in the state in which they emerge from the wearing, kniting or other manufacturing processes. Unfinished fabrics, referred to as greige or grey goods, contain many impurities, have a harsh hand and little esthetic appeal.


Before reaching the consumer market, cloth must undergo at least one and usually several finishing processes. The end result may be improved esthetics, better performances, increased durability, resistance to insects, molds, and fungi, improved safty or protection for the user, the addition of color and design, or simply the preparation of the cloth for further finishing processes.


Finishes may be appiled to cloth by mechanical means. Although many of these techniques have been in use for thousands of years, improvements in machinery design, advances in chemical technology, and the discovery of new types of finishes have greatly improved the performance of textile products while reducing the cost to the consumer. The major advances have been in the field of chemical finishes. Since now, developments such as durable-press polyester/cotton blends, shrink-resistant wool, and flame-retardant treatments have decreased maintenance requirements, improved performance, and enhanced the safty of textile materials.


The finishing processes performed on cloth from the point of manufacture until it is ready for sale may be divided into three broad categories: general finishes, functional finishes, and the application of color.


Fabric Finishing