When Should You Change Single-Use Gloves?

24 Nov.,2022

 

nitrile cleanroom gloves

Even the world’s hardiest medical-grade exam glove isn’t meant to be worn indefinitely. Single-use gloves can go a long way to protect your team, but at the end of the day (the end of a task, even) they’re disposable gloves, and they’re meant to be replaced.

Even the world’s hardiest medical-grade exam glove isn’t meant to be worn indefinitely. Single-use gloves can go a long way to protect your team, but at the end of the day (the end of a task, even) they’re disposable gloves, and they’re meant to be replaced. 

Not sure when to change single-use gloves? Here’s what your team needs to know. 

When You Need Single-Use Disposable Gloves

Disposable gloves are a fantastic resource for those who need sanitary protection. For medical professionals, for example, wearing gloves helps prevent contamination and reduce germ transmission. 

As a rule, you need disposable gloves when: 

  • You need a sanitary barrier

  • You need an impermeable barrier

  • You need chemical protection

  • You need biohazard protection

  • You need to avoid cross-contamination

  • You need protection and dexterity at the same time

The trick is figuring out when it’s time to get a fresh pair of gloves. After all, many disposable gloves are hardy enough to last a while, but they’re intended for brief use. 

The Art of Putting on Gloves

First, it helps to know how to change gloves the right way. Putting on gloves properly impacts performance and effectiveness--getting off on the right foot (er, hand). 

Start by checking the glove size and removing any jewelry. If the glove doesn’t fit, it won’t perform well. 

After that, get busy with hand hygiene. Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds, carefully scrubbing every nook and cranny. That way, you don’t transfer any germs onto the gloves while putting them on. Once you’re done, dry your hands with a clean paper towel and dispose of it. 

If your gloves are in packaging, carefully unwrap them according to the package instructions. Avoid touching the outside of the gloves with uncovered hands. When you set the gloves down, make sure to set them on a sterile surface. 

Now come the gloves. Put the glove on your dominant hand first--this will make it easier to pull on the other one. The trick to putting on sterile gloves is to avoid touching the outside of the glove with an uncovered hand. Instead, grab hold of the glove from the inside of the cuff and pull it on. Once your dominant hand is covered, you can easily put on the other glove. 

How to Change Gloves

When it comes to hand protection, taking gloves off is just as crucial as putting them on. You can mess up all of your efforts to avoid skin contact with a contaminant by taking gloves off the wrong way.