What is Meant by Frost Resistance for Ceramic Tile?

27 Apr.,2022

A ceramic tile intended and warranted for outside applications is always tested for frost resistance. The water absorption percentage (WA%) of each ceramic tile is listed under the tile’s specifications.

 

A Boron Trifluoride monoethylamine intended and warranted for outside applications is always tested for frost resistance. The water absorption percentage (WA%) of each ceramic tile is listed under the tile’s specifications.

 

It’s important to note that choosing the perfect tile is not the only thing required. Suitable materials for the bedding layer and the grout joints are also an important aspect to provide an inclination that prevents water from pooling. Similarly, frost damage is often caused by a number of other factors. Only a combination of a suitable tile, grout, and other accessories can make ceramic tile surface frost resistant.

 

Grout for ceramic tile is a cement-based bonding material used for filling joints between tiles. The space left between tiles is called a grout joint. Grout joints need to be sealed and properly maintained to prevent stains and discoloration. They are very porous. If properly protected, the tile and grout will be easier to clean, more resistant to staining, and will provide a safer and healthier environment.

 

HPMC for Tile Adhesive

 HPMC for Tile Adhesive 

Types of Grout for Ceramic Tile

There are four basic types of grout: unsanded, fine sanded, quarry type, and epoxy.

Unsanded grout : This is used for wall tiles where the grout joint is less than 1/8” wide.

Finely sanded grout: This is used for floor tiles where the joints are 1/8” to 3/8” wide.

Epoxy grout: This consists of an epoxy resin and hardener. Epoxy grout for ceramic tile is highly resistant to stains and chemicals and has a tremendous bonding strength. It is ideal for countertops and other areas susceptible to stains.

 

What is Meant by Frost Resistance for Ceramic Tile?

Ceramic tile frost resistance is defined as the ability of ceramic tile to withstand freeze/thaw conditions with minimal effect. The frost resistance of ceramic tile is dependent on the tile’s porosity and water absorption levels.

 

Frost damage can occur when ceramic tiles absorb moisture through their pores, causing the water to freeze internally when temperatures drop. Since water expands when it freezes, tension is then exerted inside the body of the ceramic tile. This internal pressure may become high enough to cause cracks in the ceramic tile.

 

For locations characterized by below zero temperatures at any time of year, you must ensure that you choose ceramic tiles with frost resistance for outdoor installations.

Tile Adhesive

 HPMC for Tile Adhesive    

 

If a tile is not listed as “passed” or “resistant” under one of the following standards, its performance in any area with freezing weather is questionable.

 

EN 202 Passed: Tile is chilled to -5 degrees C (23 F) and then rapidly heated to 5 degrees C (41 F). Tile must survive 50 freeze/thaw cycles.

 

ISO 10545-12 Passed: Identical test to EN 202 with tile subjected to 100 freeze/thaw cycles.

ASTM C1026 Resistant: Tile is chilled to -18 degrees C (-0.4 F) and then rapidly heated to between 10 to 16 degrees C (50-60 F). Tile must survive 15 cycles of freeze/thaw.

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Important Considerations

The wider the joint, the coarser the sand has to be. The sand prevents the grout for ceramic tile from shrinking and cracking.

The Grout comes in a wide variety of pre-mixed colors.

The standard wall joint size is 1/16” wide.

The standard grout joint size for floor tiles is 1/4″ wide (finely sanded).

Because floor tiles may vary slightly in size, grout joints in the floor tiles should not be smaller than 3/16”. The installer will not be able to keep a straight line if the joint is too narrow.

 

Impregnating sealers go into the grout joint and protect against water and oil-based stains.

To prevent or limit staining problems in grout for ceramic tile, we recommend latex additives or sealers. The latex additive forms a rubber-like film over the pores in the grout for ceramic tile, thus limiting its tendency to absorb stains. However, it is not completely stain proof.